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Environmental ethics and process thinking

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Published by Clarendon Press, Oxford University Press in Oxford, New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Environmental ethics.,
  • Deep ecology.,
  • Thought and thinking.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. [224]-233) and index.

StatementClare Palmer.
SeriesOxford theological monographs
Classifications
LC ClassificationsGE42 .P36 1998
The Physical Object
Paginationxi, 243 p. ;
Number of Pages243
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL685544M
ISBN 100198269528
LC Control Number97032420

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: Environmental Ethics and Process Thinking (Oxford Theology and Religion Monographs) (): Palmer, Clare: BooksCited by: In this study, Clare Palmer challenges the belief that the process thinking of writers like A.N. Whitehead and Charles Hartshorne has offered an unambiguously positive contribution to environmental ethics. She compares process ethics to a variety of other forms of environmental ethics, as well as deep ecology, and reveals a number of. Get this from a library! Environmental ethics and process thinking. [Clare Palmer] -- Here Palmer challenges the belief that the process thinking of writers like A.N. Whitehead & Charles Hartshorne has offered an unambiguously positive contribution to environmental ethics. She. In this study, Clare Palmer challenges the belief that the process thinking of writers like A.N. Whitehead and Charles Hartshorne has offered an unambiguously positive contribution to environmental ethics. She compares process ethics to a variety of other forms of environmental ethics, as well as deep ecology, and reveals a number of difficulties associated with process thinking about the.

Environmental ethics is an established field of practical philosophy "which reconstructs the essential types of argumentation that can be made for protecting natural entities and the sustainable use of natural resources." The main competing paradigms are anthropocentrism, physiocentrism (called ecocentrism as well), and nmmental ethics exerts influence on a large range of. Individualist deontological approaches to environmental ethics refer to that are used by ethicists that reject consequentialism and are called ‘individualist’ since ethical focus is given more to individuals as compared to systems or collectives. However, as all these are opposed to consequentialism, it is important to note that some of these approaches are not necessarily against systemic. For a good summary of environmental ethics as it relates to land use planning I recommend reading Chapter 7 of the book on land use ethics by Timothy Beatley (Ethical Duties to the Environment). 41 The basis of a biocentric or deep ecology approach to environmental ethics is that people owe duties to non-human life, because there exists an. In Environmental Ethics and Process Thinking, Palmer examines whether process philosophy, in particular the philosophies of Alfred North Whitehead and Charles Hartshorne, can provide an appropriate background for engaging in environmental ethics. Process thought, Clark notes, has frequently appealed more to theologically-inclined environmental ethicists than classical theism; in particular Alma mater: University of Oxford.

  This lesson presents a decision making guide that will allow you to integrate what you have learned in the prior lessons. The chief value of this guide is that it will challenge you to clarify your own thinking about the various factors that need to be weighed to make an ethical decision regarding an environmental issue. Stewardship is a highly-loaded term that generates controversies (Mathevet and Bousquet, ). Some authors have argued that the notion of steward in its very etymological essence implies a gift. Joseph DesJardins' Perspective on the Rapid Growth of Population and Our Responsibilities to Future Ancestors Joseph DesJardins, environmental ethicist and author of Environmental Ethics, began the fourth chapter of his book, titled “Responsibilities to Future Generations,” by denoting the world’s growing population and the resulting consequences. With Environmental Ethics: An Overview for theTwenty-First Century, author and philosopher Robin Attfield takes the reader through environmental ethics methodically and carefully. Attfield repeats topics as necessary, reminds readers periodically what they should be understanding, and continues to cross-reference the topic under discussion with /5(8).